Student Placement

5 Things I have learned about Taeaomanino Trust (“TT”) in
Porirua, New Zealand

 

It’s been seven weeks since I bid farewell to my home in Ohio, United States and
moved across the world to Wellington to complete my fieldwork experience here at
Taeaomanino Trust (TT). I’ve learned a lot about this beautiful organisation in
Porirua and the community that it serves.

1. TT is a safe and welcoming environment. I felt very welcomed and comfortable with the
team from my first day to the last!
2. They very much value respect for everyone that comes to the service. There is respect for
everyone’s differences and values.
3. They were very flexible with my placement schedule, allowing me to do many field
observations while also getting to explore the Wellington area during my time here.
4. Everyone who works at TT has a genuine love for the people and community that they
serve, they make it known that every person there is cared for.
5. They utilize models of care from a cultural perspective and emphasize the inclusion of
Pacific and Maori cultural values in their work.

 

The above narrative is written by Anna, who was our very first international student placement. We are extremely pleased to have had the opportunity to share our work with her.

         

 

 

 

The Tuiga Project

Empowerment and Well-being

The Tuiga, a Samoan adornment that plays a significant role with the Fa’aSamoa.

The Samoan mothers’ group known as the Taeaoafua Taeaoumaua with the support of Taeaomanino Trust, celebrated with members of the community and their families the completion of the Tuiga project.

The women made two Tuiga’s each, the traditional design represents who they are, their families, and where they are from in Samoa. The Tuiga is a ceremonial headdress significant to the Samoan Culture and highly relevant to Samoan women’s lives.

The completion of the Tuiga project asserts innovation, evolves empowerment and well-being for the group and for other women of the Samoan communities.  The mother’s group has delved straight to start their next project aiming to show case in October.

Watch this Space!

             

 

 

 RED Program 

“Become the change you want to see in the world.” – Gandhi

Last month, we delivered the RED program over a period of 5 weeks. The purpose of the program is to provide people with the opportunity to restore themselves to a safe place, empower themselves to rebuild and to defend their loved ones to fortify stronger relationships. We are extremely proud of our participants.

Taeaomanino would like to acknowledge the Department of Corrections, in Porirua and Wellington for their awesome support. Lastly, a huge thank you to all our Guests speakers who made themselves available to deliver their powerful, emotional and inspirational ‘personal experiences’ to our audience.

 

 

 

 

Taeaomanino Trust Promo video

Over the past few months we have partnered with Igknight Studios who have created a meaningful and powerful piece of work for us. A huge thank you again to everyone at Igknight , please see our video below.

 

 

Corrections recognises Taeaomanino Trust

Community Partnership - Taeaomanino Trust and Corrections

Community Partnership – Taeaomanino Trust and Corrections

Corrections has acknowledged a Porirua organisation which helps offenders turn away from family violence.

Porirua’s Taeaomanino Trust has been recognised with a Community Partnership Award from Wellington District Community Corrections.

“The Community Partnership Award acknowledges the Trust’s work with Corrections and the offenders we manage,” says Wellington District Manager Sue Abraham.

Theresa Nimarota, Chief Executive of Taeaomanino Trust, says “We’re grateful for the award and the recognition it brings.  It affirms the innovative work we’ve been doing across the organisation including the RED programme.”

Follow this link to read the full article

Porirua mama’s tivaevae project

Porirua mamas working on tivaevae.

Porirua Cook Islands women gather every Wednesday at Te Akapuanga Hall in Cannons Creek to revive one of Cook Islands treasures, the tivaevae (quilt), for an exhibition planned in July.

With the help of Taeaomanino Trust, these women were provided with sewing machines, scissors, cotton and materials through Whānau Ora fund to do what they do best – knitting and cutting unique Pacific patterns for tivaevae.

Ngaro Teuruaa, 78, has a passion for tivaevae making and is willing to share her knowledge with other women.

“I am determined to lead this group of women which started as six members, mainly Cook Island mamas who came together to share their love of tivaevae making. Today we have Samoan and Tokelauan mothers who are part of the group and we open up to all mothers willing to learn.”

Theresa Nimarota, Chief Executive Taeaomanino Trust says the Trust recognises the value of this group as an important part of reviving culture and language.

“It is the sharing and passing down of knowledge and caring for each other, and having a place for our mamas to come together to stitch and learn and pass on their knowledge to younger generations.”

“We are grateful for the Whānau Ora funding to help them out and enable them to host other people to visit their group and talk with these women as part of learning.”

Follow the link below to read the full article

Porirua mama’s tivaevae project

Follow this link to read more about the Mama’s Tivaevae group ‘Stitching culture and community together”

Follow this link for more information about the Project Mama’s event in Porirua

Latest News from the Central Pacific Collective

Taeaomanino Trust is a member of the Central Pacific Collective. Please follow this link for the latest news and events from their website.